Week 22–Figurative Language

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This week we are going to focus on figurative language. I passed out some essays written by John Malcolm Brinnin last time we had class. One of them is about figurative language. You will need to read and study that essay this week.

I purchased your tickets for the field trip. If you haven’t seen it yet, please look at the list and see how much you need to pay for your tickets and please bring cash or a check on Friday– Importance of Being Earnest Field Trip Update

Monday–

  • Read John Malcolm Brinnin’s essay on figurative language
  • Journal 11
  • Read “Tiburon” (below)

Tuesday–

  • Print and do half of the worksheet on Metaphors and Similes–Questions 1-10 (write Activity 14 on the top of this page and put it in your poetry folder)
  • Literary Response and Analysis Questions-Tiburon (scroll down) Write Activity 15 on the top of this page and put it in your poetry folder

Wednesday–

  • Journal 12
  • Finish the worksheet on Metaphors and Similes–Questions 11-20 (write Activity 14 on the top of this page and put it in your poetry folder)
  • Read “Hope is a Thing With Feathers”

Thursday–

  • Pack your money to pay for your tickets to the field trip! 🙂 
  • Literary Response and Analysis Questions-“Hope is a Thing With Feather” (scroll down) Write Activity 16 on the top of the page and put it in your poetry folder
  • Work on your poetry folder. Make sure that you have all the assignments completed and filed in order. Make sure each assignment is labeled with the activity number at the top. You will be graded on this work as a whole. So I expect it to be well organized and in order.

Poetry Folder:

  • Activity 1–“Dust of Snow” and “Lost”
  • Activity 2–Analysis of Art Picture
  • Activity 3–“What Skills Help You Enjoy poetry” chapter and “Your Turn”
  • Activity 4–Analysis of “My Father’s Song” and “First Lesson”
  • Activity 5–Analysis of “A Blessing”
  • Activity 6–Analysis of “Woman Work” and “Daily”
  • Activity 7–Analysis of Haiku
  • Activity 8–Analysis of “Once By the Pacific” by Robert Frost
  • Activity 9–Scanning “Stopping by Woods…”
  • Activity 10–Scanning “When I Consider…”
  • Activity 11–Analysis of “Stopping by Woods…” and “When I Consider”
  • Activity 12-Edgar Allan Poe “The Bells”
  • Activity 13- “Base Stealer” and “American Hero”
  • Activity 14-Metaphor and Simile Worksheet
  • Activity 15-Analysis of “Tiburon”
  • Activity 16-Analysis of “Hope” is a Thing With Feathers

Literary Focus

Similes

“When you compare two unlike things using a specific word of comparison such as like, as, or resembles, you are using a simile. A simile is much more imaginative than a simple, literal comparison. If you say, “That car is as red as an apples,” you are expressing a simple comparison. It is a literal truth that the color of the apple and the color of the car are similar. If however, you say, “That car is as sweet and delicious as an apple,” you are using a simile. The car cannot be bitten into as an apple can, and it certainly would not taste delicious if you could eat it. What the simile does communicate to us is how much you love that red car. The poem “Tiburon” is based on one simile. The simile is first suggested in the title, which means shark.” (Holt, Elements of Literature)

Tiburon

East 116th
and a long red car
stalled with the hood up
roaring salsa
like a prized shark
mouth yanked open
and down in the stomach
the radio
of the last fisherman
still tuned
to his lucky station

by, Martin Espada

Literary Response and Analysis Questions

Use complete sentences!

  1. Describe the scene in the poem.
  2. Where does the salsa music come from?
  3. Think about the images in the poem. What can you see? Hear?
  4. This poem is based on a simile comparing a car to a shark. In what ways is this car like a shark?
  5. What do you think has happened to the “last fisherman”? Why is his station “lucky”?

Literary Focus

Metaphor

“This famous poem is built around a metaphor that is carried throughout the entire work. Emily Dickinson states her metaphor in the first line: “Hope,” she says, is the “thing with feathers.” Notices all the ways she imagines how the gift of hope is like a bird (“the thing with feathers”). When a metaphor is developed over several lines or even through an entire poem like this, it is called an extended metaphor.” (Holt, Elements of Literature)

“Hope” is the thing with feathers

“Hope” is the thing with feathers –
That perches in the soul –
And sings the tune without the words –
And never stops – at all –
And sweetest – in the Gale – is heard –
And sore must be the storm –
That could abash the little Bird
That kept so many warm –
I’ve heard it in the chillest land –
And on the strangest Sea –
Yet – never – in Extremity,
It asked a crumb – of me.
by, Emily Dickinson

Literary Response and Analysis Questions

Use complete sentences!

  1. Dickinson uses a metaphor that compares hope to a bird. Where does the bird perch? Under what conditions has the speaker heard it sing?
  2. What does hope (or the bird) ask for in return for its song?
  3. A gale is a strong wind. What do you think the “gale” symbolizes, or stands for, in this poem?
  4. Think of all the ways Dickinson extends the metaphor. How is hope’s song endless? How does it keep you warm?
  5. How do you interpret what the speaker says about hope in the last stanza?

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