Week 22–Gertrude Stein, Robert Frost, Carl Sandburg, and T.S. Eliot <3

I am so giggly excited for some of the stuff you get to read this week!!!! I feel like I am next in line, about to get on Tatsu at Six Flags!!! “Weeeeee!”

First I want you to read this historical background to the time period we are learning about from Norton.

Here is their timeline for the authors for the next two weeks. Please print it out and put it in your notebook.

Here we go!!! This week we are going to read Gertrude Stein, Robert Frost, Carl Sandburg, and the guy who wrote one of my ALL TIME FAVORITE POEMS … T.S. Eliot.

This week you will have about 30 minutes of reading each day. I want you to spend another 30-60 minutes each day working on your projects that are due this Friday. I am not assigning any journals, since you have a big writing assignment. In fact, if you want to take a couple days off grammar this week, feel free.

Monday–Gertrude Stein

Gertrude Stein was a very important figure in literary circles during this time period. She was a famous, celebrated lover of the arts, she was a strong female mind, and she wrote the most hilariously random stuff. Her book Tender Buttons is a collection of random observations. You will certainly get a kick out of it. It may help you with your Quote Yourself Projects! LOL

First–watch this short biography on her life. It does discuss her homosexuality in a general way (not detailed). I think it is important that you know that Ellen was not the first lesbian celebrity in the world. She is certainly no Anne Bradstreet, but this is history and we need to see how society changes as we enter the Twentieth Century.

Biography

Then read Tender Buttons. Please leave your favorite quote in the comments below 🙂 As you read it remember that she was friends with Picasso. She is the Picasso of writers!!! This is verbal cubism, stream of consciousness writing, total experimental language art. And remember . . . sugar is not a vegetable. (aaaaah). My very favorite one of hers is “The Purse”– Super random. Try reading them out loud as if they are super important. (Tristan, feel free to laugh, say, “What?!?!” and scratch your head and roll your eyes).

from– Tender Buttons, this is just my favorite parts (you don’t have to read the whole thing)

Tuesday–Robert Frost

Robert Frost is one of the greatest American poets. I have some of his poems memorized. Please watch this short biography video before you get into his poetry.

Biography

Then read the following poems:

“Stopping By Woods on a Snowy Evening”

“The Road Not Taken”

“Birches”

I want you to read each poem several times. You can’t understand them fully with just one reading. That is why I am only giving you 3 today. I need you to spend at least 30-45 minutes reading and dissecting them. Feel free to print them out and take notes on structure and style.

Wednesday–Carl Sandburg

Go ahead and read Carl Sandburg’s poems without his biography and then try to figure out for yourself what kind of a man he was 🙂

“Chicago”

“Fog”

After you have read these poems, please finish working on your Short Stories and your Quote Yourself Projects.

Thursday–T.S. Eliot

So let’s just read one of the most famous poems EVER–“The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

This poem is seriously one of my favorites. That is why I saved if for last this week. I read this poem still, often. Golly, I just read it a couple months ago and posted part of it on my Facebook. Try and memorize part of it. If you want. I would.

Here is a clip of him reading it his own voice. He is so interesting and intelligent. I love him.

I just listened to it again just now. wow.

You know, it is so nice that we actually have recordings of him reading it in his own voice; what a treasure!

Now, listen to it as Anthony Hopkins reads it:

Assignments For Credit–

  • Please go ahead and leave another comment on Thursday–share with me what you think of Eliot, Sandburg, and Frost.
  • The Short Story Project is due this Friday!
  • The Quote Yourself Project is due this Friday!

 

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54 thoughts on “Week 22–Gertrude Stein, Robert Frost, Carl Sandburg, and T.S. Eliot <3

  1. “Tender Buttons” was the strangest thing I’ve ever read. It made absolutely no sense… which is why I love it! Of course, ‘sugar is not a vegetable’ and ‘the sash is not like anything mustard it is not
    like a same thing that has stripes, it is not even more hurt than that, it has a little top’ are my favorite quotes. I loved the part where she said “mustard”. XD ! ~

    1. How to write a sensation like ‘Tender Buttons’ in just two steps:
      1) empty your mind completely.
      2) write down whatever words come to mind. Nevermind if they aren’t even correct English, man, just write!
      3) go over your literary masterpiece and laugh. never correct it or backspace, just keep it and publish it!
      RESULT-
      Button is pug have dog you to thank you in jay ugly hat. Refund seashell coral mustard hot-dog cat bug bat pug. Bird robin jay guy gutter boy ugly baseball cap. Ketchup Heinz Frozen Prince Hans of the Southern Isles in secretly Anna and Elsa’s tavern opal oval kitty snake. Kitty snake. KITTY SNAKE!!! AAAAH! Like a suitcase is a button, so scarves cannot be mustard. The end. Fin. Sugar is not a vegetable.
      Man, write, man, write! Just write your answers onto the page! Use a baseball bat glove and use your tone toenail polish to your purpose wonderful quail. KITTY SNAKE! The end. Fin. Sugar is not a vegetable.

    2. You know the store Anthropologie? The overpriced haven of all things special? Well, I have a word I use for things, “hidden pretty.” If I find a jacket or a sweater and say the tag is done with a special fabric or embellishment, and no one will ever see it. That is hidden pretty. Oh pockets, that have yellow flowered fabric on the inside. Hidden pretty. A coffee cup that is all vintage and cute, but it has a green paint swipe on the inside (looks like an accident, but totally on purpose). Hidden pretty. It is added character. It is a statement. That is what so much of her work is like to me. No one sees it. I delight in something that no one else notices. It is hidden pretty. “Out of kindness comes redness and out of rudeness comes rapid same question.” I probably make no sense. But in my head, Tender Buttons is like treasures from Anthropologie, made to look like family heirlooms, with detailed embellishments and character. Special. LOL. Okay enough of a peek into my crazy head!!!!

  2. I have never been so confused before in my life…
    A WHITE HUNTER
    “A white hunter is nearly crazy.”
    A SOUND.
    “Elephant beaten with candy and little pops and chews all bolts and
    reckless reckless rats, this is this.”

    I think I like these the best. lol I really don’t know why but they just stood out and sorta made sense to me. lol

  3. “Light blue and the same red with purple makes a change. It shows that
    there is no mistake. Any pink shows that and very likely it is
    reasonable. Very likely there should not be a finer fancy present. Some
    increase means a calamity and this is the best preparation for three and
    more being together. A little calm is so ordinary and in any case there
    is sweetness and some of that.”

  4. Sugar is not a vegetable.

    It shows that dirt is clean when there is a volume.

    Supposing you do not like to change, supposing it is very clean that there is no change in appearance, supposing that there is regularity and a costume is that any the worse than an oyster and an exchange.

    Is there not much more joy in a table and more chairs and very likely roundness and a place to put them.

    A sight a whole sight and a little groan grinding makes a trimming such a sweet singing trimming and a red thing not a round thing but a white thing, a red thing and a white thing.

    Dirty is yellow. (I didn’t like how this made absolutely no sense, but after I read this, I gave a slight chuckle out loud. I have no idea what is wrong with me but if someone says this to me I will most likely laugh…I’m weird).

    The resemblance to yellow is dirtier and distincter.

    Enthusiastically hurting a clouded yellow bud and saucer, enthusiastically so is the bite in the ribbon.

    The kind of show is made by squeezing.

    To be a wall with a damper a stream of pounding way and nearly enough choice makes a steady midnight. It is pus.

    I believe I find the words yellow and pus funny :/

  5. “Two roads diverged in a wood, and I—
    I took the one less traveled by,
    And that has made all the difference.”

    I absolutely love this.

  6. My printer has no ink. So if anyone would print me out a copy of the timeline and give it to me on Friday, I’ll give you a heart- felt thank you. 🙂 lol

  7. “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening” by Robert Frost

    Whose woods these are I think I know.
    His house is in the village though;
    He will not see me stopping here
    To watch his woods fill up with snow.

    My little horse must think it queer
    To stop without a farmhouse near
    Between the woods and frozen lake
    The darkest evening of the year.

    He gives his harness bells a shake
    To ask if there is some mistake.
    The only other sound’s the sweep
    Of easy wind and downy flake.

    The woods are lovely, dark and deep,
    But I have promises to keep,
    And miles to go before I sleep,
    And miles to go before I sleep.

    He looks like Carl Fredricksen from Disney – Pixar’s “UP” and his poetry is amazing! God blessed this man with the gift and art of poetry ❤ You go, Carl – I mean – You go, Robert!

  8. Robert Frost is one of my favorites, though I disagree with his views of freeverse. I have a book of selected poems of his.

    Gertrude Stein utterly perplexed me; I don’t know just how I feel about her work. Part of me totally loves it while the other part is bothered by it.

    Carl Sandburg, his poem “Fog” is one of my looongtime favorite poems of all time. Love this guy.

    T.S. Elliott was pretty good too, I adore the last couple stanzas of “The Love Song Of J. Alfred Prufrock”. I would like to read more of his work in the future:)

    And Ms. Brandi, I absolutely love this stuff:) great job on the English course:) ❤

  9. “Fog” by Carl Sandburg was so cute, even though it was so tiny! I think that’s mainly because I’m reading “Warrior Cats: Into the Wild” (Great book by the way, I’ve been reading it since I was in 3rd grade. No joke. I restarted the series. There’s 28 books in the entire Warrior Cat series! You should give it a go at http://www.warriorcats.com) I can vividly imagine a cat in the fog on it’s haunches, stalking a mouse, silently following it as he creeps stealthily by. ~ Ah, but, in my personal opinion, I imagine Carl Sandburg to be either a young, wealthy man or a little old man who’s all sweet and hunched over, who’s got battle scars from the wars he’s fought. I love old people ❤

  10. Tender Buttons

    Light blue and the same red with purple makes a change. It shows that there is no mistake. Any pink shows that and very likely it is reasonable. Very likely there should not be a finer fancy present. Some increase means a calamity and this is the best preparation for three and more being together. A little calm is so ordinary and in any case there is sweetness and some of that.

    What is the sash like. The sash is not like anything mustard it is not like a same thing that has stripes, it is not even more hurt than that, it has a little top.

    Enthusiastically hurting a clouded yellow bud and saucer, enthusiastically so is the bite in the ribbon.

    To be a wall with a damper a stream of pounding way and nearly enough choice makes a steady midnight. It is pus.
    A shallow hole rose on red, a shallow hole in and in this makes ale less. It shows shine.

    A little monkey goes like a donkey that means to say that means to say that more sighs last goes. Leave with it. A little monkey goes like a donkey.

  11. Sandburg was intriguing,
    and Stein was quite strange.
    You claim that Eliot is best,
    yet I differ and disagree.
    Almost he is, almost purebred,
    but it is plain to see.
    Mr. Carl- I mean, Frost.
    His poems are simply best to me.

    Out of these four, you can
    ignore all of the other three.
    But only one has the key
    to seek and make and create wonderful, real poetry.

    My little horse must think it queer
    to see you grinning ear to ear
    at Eliot’s life in coffee spoons.
    Now Eliot is surely doomed

    He gives his harness bells a shake
    To ask if there is some mistake.
    “Brandi, it is plain to see,
    Frost is simply best to me.”

    But, in the end, I count not,
    nor do the poems here.
    My little horse must think is queer
    to see we’ve been deceived.
    God is the poet, so talented,
    and we are His poetry.

  12. Robert Frost –
    He seems like a cool guy (judging from hid poems). I think he takes the spot for “favorite poet” on this week’s poem writers.

    Carl Sandburg –
    His poem style is short, simple and straight to the point, maybe too simple like the poem “Fog”

    T. S. Eliot –
    I think he’s good too, but I think I’d personally prefer Hopkins to read the poem. (brandiplsdontlowermygrade) lolno

  13. Robert Frost: My favorite poem from him was “Stopping By Woods on a Snowy Evening”. I really enjoyed reading it, however, I don’t think there was a “hidden pretty” in this one :/.

    Carl Sandburg: “Fog”….. That’s all I have to say. Just joking, but “Fog” is really short. Although it is short, and there really is no moral or anything like that, I think it should be considered a “hidden pretty”. The way he describes the fog, to me, took some time to picture, but I thought it was unique the way I pictured it.

    T.S. Elliot: Okay, I liked this one a little too much. I read it three times, and it seems in every rhyme there is a “hidden pretty” there. I liked the words he used, and the way he used them. This author is my favorite out of all of them.

  14. Robert Frost: I liked “The Road Not Taken” a lot. Especially the ending when he says, “Two roads diverged in a wood, and I— I took the one less traveled by, And that has made all the difference.” Just wow. I love it

    Carl Sandburg: “Fog” Okay, I didn’t really like this one. I don’t now maybe I just don’t have the “poetic” eye for it… :/

    T.S Elliot: I liked this one. 🙂 I can agree (with demistars9) about his choice of words. I loved the words he used and the way he used them.

  15. I like understanding whats going on, and i had no clue what Gertrude Stein was saying, therefore it wasn’t my cup of tea. I was tried reading it out loud hoping it would make more sense. It did not. It reminded me of third grade, when you would say random stuff to be funny or clever. i appreciated the way she wrote, the long run on sentences with a bunch of commas and then short staccato sentences. My favorite quote was “sugar is not a vegetable.”

  16. Robert Frost: I really like Frost’s poems. They make you stop, analyze and take in what you are reading, which allows you to enjoy the poems even more. Out of the three, I favored Stopping By Woods on a Snowy Evening

    Carl Sandburg: Sanburg’s poems where both descriptive and well written. In his poem Chicago, it made me relflect on what the city Chicago was like back then, and the lives of the people. “Fog” was very interesting, due to the wording Sandburg used to describe fog. It was fairly short, but that is what made this poem stand out even more.

    T.S Elliot: Elliot’s structure, as well as his use of words, made the poem come to life. It was one my favorites out of all the other poems that I have read. I liked the fact that we got to listen to the poem by T.S Elliot and Anthony Hopkins. It brings it to a whole new perspective as you listen.

    1. I don’t think so… make it unique ! ~ ❤ Like how she showed us:

      "BLAH BLAH BLAH. Quote, quote, quote. (Insert inspirational stuff here) Finn." ~Hope The Owl

      "Hear the echo through the tunnel, hear the echo through the sky. Leave a footprint, make a ripple: leave something to show that you've been here behind." -Hope the Owl

      In your case, it'd be:

      "My name is Macey . I am a mutt. I like to eat pizza. I'm a dog. I'm not a frog. I'm so cute. Look at my nose. It looks like a button. This quote is strange. The end, and FINNI!" -Macey the Pizza

  17. Robert Frost: Reading Robert Frost just makes me feel as wrapped up in a cozy blanket. The way his poems are written they just seem like you can snuggle up and read them.
    Carl Sandburg: Oh my goodness, I absolutely loved Carl Sandburg, I read “Chicago” four times in a row and it was so much fun to read aloud. “Fog” was interesting because you glance at it and think “hmm well this doesn’t seem like much.” and it doesn’t have big fancy words or stanza upon stanzas to unravel a story, but its simple and ingenious.
    T.S.Elliot: Having the poem read to me helped to understand it and each time I heard it, it just sounded pretty. Just the way it sounded was gorgeous.

  18. Carl Sandburg: He has such meaning and depth implemented into his writings while they seem shallow and meaningless to the untrained eye. He delivers a powerful message in a very subtle way.

    T.S.Elliot: He writes with such eloquence and serenity. It seems like the words flowed out of his mouth and right onto the paper. It doesn’t seem unnatural at all, like other writings can be. They may come off choppy or slightly broken, but T.S.Elliot avoids that completely.

    Robert Frost: He writes poems that are to be read on a cold winters day, next to a roaring fire. Or on a nice summer day, in the park, with a slight breeze blowing. (LOL, my mind is crazy) Anyways. Robert Frost writes efficiently and allows his emotions and thoughts to come out through his work.

    1. Someones trying to catch up I see haha. Don’t want to be a disgrace to your family. Dude seriously, reading your comment I can imagine you wearing your 1920’s attire with a cup of coffee petting a cat lol 😀

  19. Gertrude Stein: An interesting character, not quite sure how to explain her writing style as it comes across broken and spontaneous. Like she’s writing because she has the right to, with no meaning behind anything that she writes.

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