Week 10–Uncle Tom’s Cabin and Characterization

Class Recap: November 14

“In Ramah there was a voice heard,–weeping, and lamentation, and great mourning;

Rachel weeping for her children, and would not be comforted.” 

This week our reading begins with an allusion to the passage of Scripture above. This verse is found in Jeremiah 31:15 as well as Matthew 2:18, where it was fulfilled. Read through that passage and see what it is referring to. And ponder why Stowe compares the situations she writes about with this passage of Scripture. Leave a comment below with your ideas.

Reading Assignments:

This week we will read chapters 12 through the end of 19. It is 103 pages. Again, please divide your reading wisely.

If you would like to listen as you read, here is a link to the audiobook readings. Chapters 12-15 and Chapters 16-18 and Chapter 19-23 (you only need to read chapter 19)

Again, I need to keep underlining important lines in the book. You will need to start a list in the back of page numbers that go with the themes of “Christianity and Faith,” “Slavery,” and “Freedom.” Like the one I showed you in class. I am going to check your books in class on Friday. Look at this novel as a workbook. I need you to connect with it, make notes in it, and decide what is important in it (underlining).

This is a skill that you need to take with you into college. It will save you HOURS of time re-reading and looking for important lines.

Characterization Charts:

I also want you to complete the characterization charts that I gave you in class. You need to use proper in-text citation for this assignment, meaning I want in parenthesis the last name of the writer an the page number. Ex. (Stowe 24). If you need to expand your character trait vocabulary, here is an exhaustive list 🙂

In Text Citation:

Please read these guidelines for in-text citation from the Purdue Online Writing Lab (OWL). Make sure you pay careful attention to the directions and bookmark this page on your computer, for future reference. Your work, in writing down quotes for characterization this week is practice in teaching you proper in-text citation. Your next essay will need to demonstrate your mastery of this skill.

This week you will be back to writing 4 journals 🙂

Your Assignments: 

  • Comment on the verse (10 pts.)
  • Characterization work, with page citations (30 pts.)
  • Read Chapters 12-19 and take notes in the back and underline at least two sentences per chapter. (30 pts.)
  • Write your name in the book so I can pass them back to you after school. (2 pts.)
  • Signed Homework Assignment Sheet (5 pts.)
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27 thoughts on “Week 10–Uncle Tom’s Cabin and Characterization

  1. “In Ramah there was a voice heard,–weeping, and lamentation, and great mourning; Rachel weeping for her children, and would not be comforted.”

    This is basically what Eliza is going through. Eliza is crying for her child, and can’t be comforted, because she doesn’t want him to be taken away. I would understand why she would compare that scripture to some of the situations she writes about.

    1. Yes! I am sorry. I mentioned in class that what I want you guys to do, and it will help you later in college, is to write down themes in the back of the book (slavery, Christianity, The Bible, Freedom, Wickedness, etc) and then every time you find an important sentence that sticks out to you and applies to this theme, underline it in the text and then make write that page number next to the theme in the back. That way when you start to write your essay, you already have a good collection of quotes ready to use, and you don’t have to waste time searching for good quotes for hours before you write. It is a major time saving technique. I use it all the time, even when I read for enjoyment. Because I am just that nerdy!!! LOL. I can text you a picture.

  2. Stowe compares this due to the fact that one of Emily Shelby’s children had died and she refuses to be comforted by her own children with the matter. However, resolving this question as to why she didn’t allow comfort, she ‘lets go’ of her child by giving Eliza her little boy’s clothes. I think Stowe compared it because Mrs Shelby had represented Rachel in the situation because she WAS a direct representation of Rachel due to her weeping and mourning over her deceased child. I just can’t see why she compared the events though. Perhaps it’s because Eliza’s little Harry could have been taken at any moment from her? Or maybe it’s because of Mrs. Shelby’s lost little one and her action, or event, which consisted of giving Eliza her child’s clothes, even though she hated to part with it.

  3. “In Ramah there was a voice heard,–weeping, and lamentation, and great mourning; Rachel weeping for her children, and would not be comforted.”

    This is basically what Eliza is going through. She is worried about losing her only child, and can’t be comforted. She is also restless. That is why Stowe compares that portion of scripture to the situations that she writes.

  4. Yeah, like all the other answers…

    “In Ramah there was a voice heard,–weeping, and lamentation, and great mourning; Rachel weeping for her children, and would not be comforted.”

    It’s like Eliza because she wouldn’t rest nor eat because of her child and felt sorrowful for her child.

  5. “In Ramah there was a voice heard,–weeping, and lamentation, and great mourning; Rachel weeping for her children, and would not be comforted.”

    This is Eliza’s life at the moment. Her soul is weeping continuously for her child and she can’t be comforted until her baby is safe and out of harm’s way. 🙂

  6. “In Ramah there was a voice heard- weeping, and lamentation, and great mourning; Rachel weeping for her children, and would not be comforted”

    This is similar to what Eliza was going through; her child is in danger, and her sorrow overtakes her for her dear son, so she wont rest, eat, or be comforted.

  7. In Ramah there was a voice heard,–weeping, and lamentation, and great mourning;
    Rachel weeping for her children, and would not be comforted.”

    Stow uses this scripture, found in the beginning of chapter twelve, to display a foreshadowing and comparison in that chapter. For example, Stowe writes about a mother’s grieving, mourning, and loss of her son, due to slavery, in two settings of that chapter. This shows the comparison and foreshadowing that Stowe used with that scripture. In one of those settings, Mr. Haley bids on an old mother’s teenage son, so that he could be sold into slavery. The old mother was in agony and tears, and could not be comforted with any words of encouragement. In the other setting, “Tom had watched the whole transaction from the first to last, and had a perfect understanding of its results.”(Stowe 111). Mr. Haley had sold an eleven-month-old son over seas in secret, without the mother’s knowledge. After finding out, the mother was in shock, but later, lay on the boxes in agony. “Tom drew near, and tried to say something; but she only groaned. Honestly, and with tears running down his own cheeks, he spoke of a heart of love in the skies, of a pitying Jesus, and an eternal home; but the ear was deaf with anguish, and the palsied heart could not feel.”(Stowe111). The mother could not be comforted, and sadly, committed suicide later that night. In conclusion, Stowe uses this comparison and foreshadowing, to depict the cruelness of slavery to the reader. She also shows us how slavery can break a family and cause so much pain in the heart of a mother.

  8. “In Ramah there was a voice heard,–weeping, and lamentation, and great mourning;
    Rachel weeping for her children, and would not be comforted.”

    -This is basically explaining Eliza’s situation. She has become restless. She won’t stop running away till her son is safe from the trader Mr. Haley (who I strongly dislike with a passion).

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